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    July 16, 2011
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even a river? and if you can't go, all i have to say is cry me a river. ♪ >> reporter: hey, the corporal's got a tattoo, too. and that's just the one we can see. when we asked the friend who helped set up the facebook page whether kelsey could kick ojustn timberlake's butt if he turned her down, he said, oh, yeah, for sure. this marine isn't looking for a few good men. just one. >> okay. >> do it for your country. >> reporter: jeanne moos, cnn, new york. >> dates going on. that's it for me. thank you very much for watching. join us weekdays in "the situation room" from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. eastern, every saturday at 6:00 p.m. eastern here on cnn. and at this time every weekend on cnn international. the news continues next on cnn.
right now on cnn, what is going on in rochester, new york? >> i'm not deserving what they're doing, and they're arrested me. i don't understand what's going on. i did nothing. i did nothing. >> all right. that's not good -- being arrested for videotaping an arrest from her own front yard. i'll talk with a local lawmaker who says he's been the target of police retaliation. plus, we investigate deeper. the outburst you see there probably won't help this woman's case. she's accused of attacking her husband. caught on tape, attacking the judge sentencing her. we're going to talk to the officer who grabbed her. and i want you to meet mama jazz and her very unique fingernail style. her longest nail, 26 inches. the one her thumb. we'll visit her house to see how she goes about her daily life. and she'll be here to answer in questions for me.
i'm don lemon at the cnn world headquarters in atlanta. a lost news to get you caught -- a lot of news to get you caught up on so let's do it. what in the world? i'm sorry i was standing my front yard. i wanted to see what was going on in my neighborhood, and you're arresting me. what the hell is going on anyhow? >> tonight we go in depth about a story behind this video. when rochester police put the cuffs on emily goode, they also set off a national debate. monitoring police versus public safety. goode, a rochester, new york, woman, was arrested for disrupting governmental administration after she recorded police making a traffic stop. her charges were later dropped, but police say citizens now feel bolder to intervene which puts everyone at risk. cnn's susan candiotti is on the story for us. >> reporter: emily goode was unwinding at home in her pajamas late one night in may when she and a friend noticed police stop
a car in front of her house. as the police were questioning the occupants, the 28-year-old community organizer was questioning why, so she hit the record button on her ipod. >> i wanted to see what they were doing to this young man. >> you guys need something? >> i -- this is my front yard, i'm just recording what your doing. it's my right. >> actually, not from the sidewalk -- >> this is my yard. >> reporter: good is speaking with rochester police officer mario masich. >> i don't feel safe with you standing behind me so i'm going to ask you to go in the house. >> i started filming, i had my feet barely on the sidewalk like this. he told me you can't watch from the sidewalk. so i stepped back just one step so i was entirely on the lawn. he said, you're not even backing up. and i said, would you like me to take a step back? you know, i will take a step back. and i -- i stepped back further. >> okay, listen, i'm not going to explain myself. you're going to end up going to jail. i'm trying to give you a warning.
oka okay? >> i'm going to back up. >> you know what -- you're going to go jail -- this is not right -- no, stay right here. >> i'm sorry. >> she dropped the ipod. her friend picked it up and kept rolling. >> i'm not deserving what they're doing and they're arresting me. i don't understand what's going on. i did nothing. i did nothing. what in the world? i'm sorry, i was standing in my front yard. i'm concerned about what's going on in my neighborhood. >> reporter: she was charged with obstruction of governmental administration, a misdemeanor. police officer masich is not allowed to speak publicly about the case, but the head of his union, mike massio, says the situation was not that good was shooting video. >> the issue here is the officer's attention was distracted from a very, potentially very dangerous situation. all she had to do was comply. if up on her porch -- go up on her porch for her own safety.
>> reporter: police chief shepherd says safety is a key issue but admits citizens have a right to shoot video in a public place. >> i don't think it was a -- a filming issue. i think if that were the issue, the film would have been confiscated. and i don't think that's the case. >> reporter: good sees the arrest as an attempt to intimidate residents. >> even though the police insist the filming isn't what got me arrested, it doesn't make sense that, you know, my -- my taller male friend was never given any orders, was never even spoken to, and he was, you know, much -- much more i guess menacing looking. he was fully dressed. i was in pajamas, you know. it seems to me like the camera was the variable. [ applause ] >> reporter: the rochester prosecutor's office later dropped the charge against emily good. however, questions involving the rochester police and video recording are still very much in play. on the same night emily good was cleared, a supporter of hers,
roch ester resident warren barnes, recorded police officers stopping people in his neighborhood. you can hear barnes speaking to the young men being questioned. >> what are you guys being detained for? what are they being detained for, officer? >> reporter: the men were released, and barnes approached the police officers. >> can i have your lieutenant's name? can i have your lieutenant's name, sir? [ inaudible ] >> can i have your business card so i know who interacted -- >> reporter: barnes says he did not record what happened next. >> i walked across the street like this gentleman's about to do. they sped across the street and said, "jaywalking, jaywalking, we got you on camera jaywalking." >> reporter: barnes was ticketed for not using a crosswalk. later changed to disorderly conduct and obstructing traffic. other charges followed including weapons possession, what barnes said was a utility knife, and marijuana possession. barnes pleaded not guilty to the charges, but says the jaywalking ticket is a way of publishing him for making a recording. police chief shepherd says
jaywalking is a violation of traffic law and led to other charges. >> there were a number of other issues involved in the case. one was possession of a weapon. there was also contraband that was seized by the police department that also resulted in that arrest. >> reporter: on youtube, video shows another incident that community activists call purely retaliatory. while emily good's supporters were inside a meeting, police took out rulers and issued parking tickets to any car more than 12 inches from the curb. rochester police chief james shepard says in each of the case his officers were enforcing the law. >> however, in the spirit of the you la, maybe they tyke -- spirit of the law, maybe they took it too far. that's to be determined. we'll look at it in terms of our internal investigation. >> reporter: rochester mayor vichds waiting for the results -- richards is waiting for the results of all the internal investigations. >> we're going to look at whether there's a pattern of arrests here. whether there's a pattern of arrests here that would indicate that this kind of arrest is
being boozed. >> reporter: emily good says she's been arrested several times over the last couple of years for civil disobedience. most recently at a local protest against foreclosure. and she's convinced that the law is on her side in terms of recording police activity. good and her supporters vow to keep cameras rolling. >> it has a powerful role in, you know, telling the officers that not only are we watching this, but, you know, potentially the whole world is watching this. >> reporter: susan candiotti, cnn, new york. when we return, a man who wasn't there that night but claims he was harassed, as well. the county legislator who claims he was a victim of police retaliation. in your mouth builp and form a layer called biofilm so strong it survives brushing. thankfully, there's listerine® antiseptic. its triple-action formula penetrates biofilm, kills germs and protects your mouth for hours. fight biofilm with listerine®.
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okay, continuing our in-depth coverage now of the rochester police incident. joining me is willie lightfoot, county legislator. mr. lightfoot, thank you for joining us. you say that rochester police officers mistreated you and that was back in may. you say you were intervening when a young african-american male was getting arrested outside your barber shop, and we have the surveillance video to show you. this is the surveillance video of what happened. officers charged you on this day with disorderly conduct, obstructing governmental administration and driving while intoxicated. then you cut a deal pleading to d dui. you said you did that to save your firefighter job. explain that to me. >> yes, first of all, i thank god for being able to be here with you. i want to say there were two more charges. this was a charge of obscene language and failure to blow in
a breathalyzer, so there were five charges that i was charged with. four got dropped in the plea. basically i took the plea because i couldn't afford to go to trial like many people in my community. and also because of my job, if i was convicted of obstruction of government administration, i would have been terminated from my employment. >> okay. so we reached out to rochester police about your situation, and they didn't want to make any further comments. but earlier, chief sheppard told our affiliate that he encouraged you to continue the complaint process, mr. lightfoot, but you dropped your complaint against the police. why did you do it? >> well, sir, when i went to make my complaint about three or four days after the incident happened, i was sitting giving my complaint. the person i was giving my complaint to was in constant defense of the individual officers. i didn't feel confident in their internal process. i believe we need an external process because people just are not confident in the rpd's
internal process, internal complaint process. >> okay. so since this incident, yours and emily good, since this controversy with you, since it began, police behavior has gotten better because people are watching officers more closely, or has it gotten worse because officers are angry now? which is it? >> don, i'm getting numerous calls from people, constituents in my community, and people in the neighborhood especially adjacent to that i represent. many people are saying that they're constantly being harassed. when i say about harassed, i believe that the way the police department treats african-americans especially in this community as opposed to caucasians is a different approach. they're much more aggressive than they are when they're approaching a caucasian resident as opposed to an african-american resident. and so i'm hearing nothing but complaints from people in the city. >> okay. so mr. lightfoot, that was the reason that emily good said she recorded that video in her front yard, because she was concerned about racial profiling and
police harassment. do you believe that this is a systematic problem with rochester police? >> absolutely. i believe that. i was a victim of that myself. i was driven around for four hours. when asked to the bathroom, i was told to urinate on myself. i was never told why i was arrested. i was treated like a common criminal and thug. and basically i've been nothing but an upstanding citizen in this community. i'm a two-time war veteran. i'm an upstanding citizen, business owner, and i came to the aid of a young man who was in handcuffs who was being threatened. and i thought that that was wrong. >> okay. how do you -- you heard the police chief say you can't be intervening in police work. if an officer asks you to do something, you should abides by that, especially if the officer doesn't feel safe. does that explanation -- is that enough for you and for the citizens of rochester? >> well, i think that you have to definitely uphold the law, and we have to let them do their job.
naturally, if you look at my video, it was said -- before my video came out, that i was acting belligerent and interfering. but when you see my video, you see me assisting the officer, trying to help find the individual he was looking for. in my opinion, we have to get to a point of who oversees the overseer. we have to ask ourselves this question. no, i don't think it's enough because they're sworn in to uphold the law. and if they're sworn in to uphold the law and tell the truth, then they have to be accountable, as well. >> all right. thank you. willie lightfoot. this is a story we'll continue to investigate. we appreciate your time. >> thank you. casey anthony just hours away from walking out of jail. where will she go? you'd be surprised the outpouring of mental health counselors and doctors and nurses and people with homes and ranches or farms, places for her to stay and protect her. >> we're going to tell you what's next for the florida woman acquitted of killing her daughter. and it was supposed to be a nightmare, but is it turning out to be a piece of cake really? what happens when los angeles
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sure, californians have survived earthquakes, wildfires, liker victories, even alien invasions. but this is the big one, folks. increased traffic on two off-peak days. >> stephen colbert didn't seem to think the so-called carmageddon in los angeles would
be that big a deal or at all this weekend. so far, he seems to be right about this. the 405, one of the busiest freeways in the country, is shut down until monday so crews can tear down a bridge. the warnings to stay off the roads, they must have worked. mayor villaraigosa did a flyover to see if there was any road congestion, and he had to be pretty happy with what he saw. live now to sandra endo, standing by on the ventura freeway. where is all this herb e heal- h helacious traffic everyone was worried about? >> reporter: right. it was anticipated on this stretch of the freeway. officials are saying so far, so good, everything is smooth sailing, what epic traffic jams that they were warning the public about for three months now. take a look behind me, down at the shutdown 405. ads you were mentioning, this is a major artery servicing san
fernando valley, and i can tell you i grew up in northridge, this is the lifeline to my grandma's house. this has caused me so much road rage or tested my patience so many times. that's how notorious it is. it's shut down, the traffic underneath smooth sailing, and a lot of cars easy breezy going on by. let's take a live look at ventura boulevard. that is the boulevard we were look at. now, if this was actually carmageddon as we'll were calling it or carpocalypse, ventura boulevard in the san fernando valley would have been backed up bumper to bumper for miles. but all morning long, we have seen cars sail on by. we've tried to see how people are getting around. some people are on their bikes, don. other people are actually -- get this -- they're actually walking in los angeles. that's pretty rare here because a lot of my friends at least get in their cars to go two blocks
to buy some coffee. so a pretty car-dependent town. the city officials are even giving free bus rides and train service to people affected in this area. but so far, it seems like the campaign to get people off the streets, off the roads, it's working because carmageddon is turning into, as they call it, came carmaheaven, don? >> thank you, appreciate it. now on cnn. shame on you! shame on you! shame on you! shame on you! shame on you! >> rupert murdoch says he is sorry for the phone hacking scandal that's infecting his news corp. empire and is making sure everyone in britain knows it. taking out giant apology ads in seven national newspapers today. the uproar has already led murdoch to shut down "the news of the world," his enormously popular u.k. tabloid. the scandal came to light whether actor hugh grant
secretly taped a conversation with a former "news of the world" journalist, paul mcmullen. i spoke with mcmullen who said that hacking phones to get information illegally happened all the time at the paper. >> everybody knew. it started from the time way back in the '90s when you could buy a scanner in a shop and sit outside a from's house and actually taperecord their entire conversation. when that became illegal to buy a scanner, all you were left with was getting into the voicemail of the celebrity or politician, whoever was being targeted. i mean, everybody knew -- it was commonplace. it wasn't just journalists. it was kids in the schoolyard who were doing it to their mate. it was just a very common trick. all you had to do was hit 9 and put in the pin code and people didn't even change their pin codes from 40. so the problem is people got such good results early on. i mean, for one example, a very
famous british blonde, someone on a fishing expedition hacked her phone, listened to three messages, and the last one was the -- saying, darling, we had such a good night last night. when you get that quality of information, instead of being the one up every now and then, it started to be done routinely and not just to the hugh grants and nicole kidmans of the world but to our readers and, worse than that, to the mobile phone of the girl who was in fact -- had died. and that's where it really came to a head because part of those who did that deleted some of the messages so it looked like her phone it h come back to life -- >> okay, you talked about millie dowler and her family. this is what i want to know -- were people as high possibly as
rupert murdoch complicit in this? would murdoch know about these practices? would people under him know about these sorts of practices? >> yeah, well people under him should have known. i mean, when rebecca brooks who is his right-hand woman in britain were doing my job -- i became deputy feature editor, we were looking at the same books we had. and we were spending 4,000 pounds a week on private investigators doing these practices. and it's extraordinary, you know, if she was the department boss who then moved up to be editor, mine, how could you not notice the spend of over $100,000 a year on this kind of thing and not ask what it's for. her position is ludicrous. and even worse than that, for her to turn around and initially for them to say we didn't know about it, it was a rogue reporter acting on his own. and now five reporters have been arrested. i've been invited to scotland
yard to be arrested three times. they were still saying we didn't know. it was just reporters actsing on their own. >> rupert murdoch and his son james have agreed to testify tuesday at a parliamentary hearing on the scandal. she was tried, she was acquitted, and now she's about to be set free. casey anthony's murder trial captivated much of the nation. the verdicts outraged many -- the verdict outraged many. as of midnight she's eligible to be set free from the orange county, florida, jail. we don't know exactly when or how the release will happen. there are some concerns about anthony's safety once she is released. but the sheriff says he's not aware of 95 credible threats to her life. i want you to take a look -- i want you to look at this freight train derailment outside minneapolis, st. paul. the train went off the tracks near a bridge that had been washed out by recent heavy rains. investigators are clearing the 17 derailed cars. service has been suspended, including to tonight's minnesota
twins game. the president and top republicans are staying out of the spotlight, but they're still working on a deal to raise the debt ceiling. the spokesman for white house speaker john boehner, i should say house speaker john boehner, tells cnn that meetings have been occurring and ideas are being exchanged. so far, though, no progress to report to you. the government has to raise its $14.3 trillion debt ceiling by august 2 or risk defaulting on its obligations. president obama and the dalai lama met today at the white house. the president praised the tibetan spiritual leader for his commitment to nonviolence. and he repeated his support for direct dialogue between china and tibet. china blasted the meeting saying it harmed relations with the u.s. and interfered with china's international affairs. china considers tibet to be a breakaway province and the dalai lama to be a separatist leader. go now --
>> that is crazy. a woman tries to attack a judge. why was she so mad? i want you to look at. this it is a giants television -- i want you to look at this. a giant television you to or fire. see what happens next. and if you want information on stories we're airing or want to give us ideas, get us at twitter, facebook,, also on foursquare. and the wait is over, transparent -- "transparent" available online right now. ♪ ooh baby, (what) can i do for you today? ♪ [ female announcer ] need help keeping your digestive balance? align can help. only align has bifantis, a patented probiotic that naturally helps maintain your digestive balance. try align to help retain a balanced digestive system. try the #1 gastroenterologist recommended probiotic. align.
a kentucky woman is behind bars after she went after a judge at a court hearing in monticello. look at what happened. >> himiss hardwoods, you will b held in contempt of court -- >> i don't care, i haven't done anything to this court. i haven't done anything to him -- >> you will be arrested for contempt of court, go now -- >> boy, melissa hardwick was in court with her husband on domestic violence charges. she lunged at the judge when the judge told her to stop interrupting. the court security officer adam dodson helped restrain hardwick. i asked if he had ever seen anything like this. >> i have seen people react this way, but only in training videos and the training they send us to. but not actually in any courtroom i worked in in the 3 1/2 years i've been there. >> yeah. when you grabbed her and you finally subdued her, what happened? was she remorseful? did you have to take her away? what happened?
>> she was not remorseful at all actually. i was -- had to administer the handcuffs on the floor. she was resisting arrest the entire time. she was fighting with me, and another bailiff tried to hold her feet, while she was doing that she was fighting with him. we got her handcuffed, picked her up and walked her out of the courtroom, she was still using foul language and actually made another threatening comment to the judge. >> the judge ordered hardwick to serve 120 days for the outburst. she also upheld a domestic violence order against her. oh! >> incredible video out of the netherlands. the top of a burning television tower collapsed in thick smoke and flames. firefighters moved to a safe distance when it became too hard to control the blaze. luckily no one was hurt. nearby tv, radio, and cell phone connections were all disrupted. it's not clear exactly what caused that fire. and remember the chilean
miners who inspired the world after they survived being trapped underground for more than two months last year? now 31 of the 33 miners are suing their government for half a million dollars in damages apiece. they say it's not about the money. they say chile failed to ensure the mine's safety and they don't want something like that to ever happen again. netflix customers, listen up. we'll tell you why the company is jacking up prices for many of its customers. [ tapping ] well, know this -- for a good deal on car insurance, progressive snapshot uses this to track my good driving habits. the better i drive, the more i save. it's crystal-clear savings and only progressive has it. nice. this has been a public savings announcement. out there with a better way. now, that's progressive. male announcer: be kind to your eyes with transitions lenses.
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the internet is broken up with netflix. it was a lifelong love affair. we thought it would last forever. nope, netflix statewided they wanted more money -- decided they wanted more money. how could you do this to me, nets flicks? how could you do this to me? >> you got to love the cnn ireporters. that's one speaking for the masses of resentful netflix customers. the company jacking up the prices of its most popular packages. now you'll have to pay separately for dvd and video streaming plans. want to bring in tech expert daniel seberg, author of "the digital diet." what's going on? what are the charges, and why is netflix doing to there our
ireporters? >> oh, no, help us! all right. so here the deal -- basically before you were paying $10 for the dvd service plus the ability to stream movies and tv shows on line. well, they've decided to break that apart. so now you're paying $8 for the dvd service and $8 for the online streaming. put those two together and you've got $16. so it's going up by about $6. and obviously about, you know, thousands of the 24 million netflix subscribers are upset. message boards have lit up. people posting they're very upset about the change. >> yeah, but isn't it cheaper -- it's a whole lot cheaper than paying for cable. are people overreacting here? >> yeah -- you could certainly say this is a bit of a virtual tempest in a teacup and that it is cheaper than other things out there. and netflix is defending its decision saying, look, this is the price of a couple of lattes. this is the way we need to go with our business model. it's expensive for netflix to do the dvd service. they would rather people move
away from that. people are used to seeing the red envelope. they would rather people just stream movies on line. it's expensive. 50 to 75 cents to send out the dvds. they're peep hoping people will -- they're hoping people will go along with it but there's resistance. >> there's another online service i want you to tell us about. it's called spotify? >> right. this has been around for years in europe and particularly in the u.k. here's the idea -- we've gone from vinyl to cassette tapes to mp3 players. now we're talking about streaming music. so in a sense you're not downloading the music anymore. you're getting it on demand. so once you've got the spotify program on your computer, you can see it -- it looks a lot like itunes, frankly. but you can start streaming your choice of music whenever you want. spotsify has partnered with the major labels, they've got about 15 million song available. it's free in the beginning,
however, it's still an invitation-only service in the u.s. right now. you can pay $5 or $10 a month for the premium service, and that means you can put it on your mobile devices, your iphone, or your android devices, as well. and you can sort of think of it as getting music any time you want as long as you've got an internet connection. say 3g at the least. and it uses peer-to-peer computing and streaming the music from their services right away. >> can i stop you right there? i have pandora, and i'm sure you do, too, and a lot of people have pandora. what's the difference between pandora and spotify? it seems like the same thing, but it's not? >> it's similar. pandora is an internet radio service that you can't choose the songs that you listen to on pandora. it tries to learn what you like, your music tastes, whereas spotify is you get to choose which music you want to listen to at any time. you can -- and then you can
store a copy on your portable devices. this is playing now -- i'm not streaming this, this is actually stored on my device. i've paid for the premium service. but you can get a copy of the music so you can have it on the go even if you don't have an internet connection. this is where we're going with the cloud, you know, this is the future of streaming music in all sorts of media. >> daniel sieberg, interesting stuff. good to see you. let's get you caught up on the headlines. the sounds of gunfire on the streets of damascus, syria. [ shouting ] >> you can see armed men in civilian clothing firing weapons. it's not clear if they are security forces, but the violence against anti-government protesters shows no signs of easing. activists say syrian troops fatally shot a demonstrator today, one day after 21 civilians died in protests across the country. the military's don't ask, don't tell policy is back in force. temporarily, that is. a three-judge panel of the ninth
circuit court has reversed itself based on a request by the obama administration. the judge has blocked the military from enforcing the policy. the government wants more time to prepare for the end of the policy, and president obama signed a repeal of the law last december. but the bill gave the pentagon an unlimited time frame to implement the change. and maybe we shouldn't be calling it carmageddon after all. there's not much gridlock to speak of in los angeles. even though a ten-mile section of the 405 freeway is shuts down until monday. crews are tearing down a bridge along the interstate which is one of the busiest in the u.s. drivers had plenty of warning, and it seems like they listened at least so far. live pictures there was the bridge being torn down on the 405. what do you know about the deathly hallows? >> it is rumored there are three. >> boy, there are a lets more than three people at the latest
"harry potter" premiere on friday. we'll tell you about it. [ cat meows ] ♪ [ whistles ] ♪ [ cat meows ] ♪ [ ting! ] [ male announcer ] travelers can help you protect the things you care about and save money with multi-policy discounts. are you getting the coverage you need and the discounts you deserve? for an agent or quote, call 800-my-coverage or visit
i'm going to call you out and ask you to come to the marine corps ball with me on november 12 in washington, d.c. and if you can't go, all i have
to say is cry me a river. >> cry me a river. that's justin timberlake's song. hey, a hollywood fairytale is playing out. justin timberlake is going to the ball. he's taking up the offer that you just heard. timberlake says he will attend corporal kelsey desantis' marine ball november 12 in washington. >> i accept. >> yea! [ applause ] >> but not because she shouted out one of my songs, which i do love whether they do that. because i'm shameless. >> all this came about after timberlake's co-star, mila kunis, created some doubt whether she will go to a marine ball with sergeant scott moore. kunis confirmed this week she will be there. [ whispering ] "harry potter" continues to draw beyond this world numbers at the box office. the final movie of the franchise
is breaking records. details coming up. and that entertainment headline that might not surprise you, but this may surprise you. "people" magazine reporting that jennifer lopez and marc anthony are splitting up. and shannon cook joins us live. so i was kind of surprised by this. did you see this one coming? >> reporter: no, i didn't. of course, i'm never surprised when a celebrity couple splits up, unfortunately. but the timing of this seems a little bit odd because the couple appeared recently, they performed together on "american idol," mere weeks ago. and they seemed really saucy together. and they've also been going around hyping this new show that they're doing together, it's called "kaviva," "the chosen," a talent contest. the two are hosting it. they're supposed to be going around latin america and trying to handpick burgeoning talent in the area. i think we've got a video that they actually did to promo the show. it doesn't have an air date yet,
but simon fuller who created "american idol" is on board with the show, so what happens to that show now that they're splitting up? i can't imagine that when you're going through a divorce you want to be hosting a show together. don, i guess this is showbiz, put on a happy smile and get on with the show i guess. you'll see -- i did -- >> it's all going to add up to more ratings and more intrigue. you said you put in a call? >> i was going to say i did reach out to the publicist of the show to find out what this means, and nobody's really saying anything yet. so i'm sure people are scrambling to figure it out themselves. >> let us know when you know. let's move on and talk about "harry potter and the deathly hallows part two." how much did it make on opening day? >> it made so much money, don, not as much as we get paid, though. it made more than $90 million in its first day which is the most amount that any film has ever grossed in a single day in the
box office. it's just doing massively well. and what a great sendoff. this is the final show, the final movie in the franchise. what a great way to say good-bye, everybody, going out with a bang. big buck. the biggest movie of the summer for sure, don. and it's only going to break more records. you'll see. >> okay. i want to say a reminder, about 15 minutes a larry king special, "harry potter: the final chapter" will run at the top of the hour, 8:00 p.m. finally, i want to talk about michael buble, the singer. he called fan so f- hief-ing cu. what's going on? >> i loved the way you said that. are we allowed to say that on c cnn? i guess so. he's talking about his older fan base. check this out. this is video, residents of the clark retirement community in grand rapids, michigan. they're doing a lip dub of one of michael buble's songs. check it out. ♪
♪ fish in the sea you know how i feel ♪ >> isn't this cute? this is so cute -- >> they are really cute. >> this was produced by film students at grand valley state university. named the whole thing in one take. it took them eight goes, don, but they did it in one take. must have kind of exhausting. and hats off to those people who got in their swimsuits. i'm amazed. >> they look hot. thank you, shannon cook. appreciate it. i want you to go the marine ball with me, as well. will you go? >> oh, absolutely. twist my arm. >> awesome. it's a date. thank you. you're not going to believe it next story. you've heard of nine inch nails? they have nothing on our next guest. find out what it's like to live with 26-inch-long african-americ fingernails. how does it do that?
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all right. we first highlighted jazz and her nails earlier this year and the response was so overwhelming we decided to find out everything we could about her and those very, very, very long nails. why does she do it? how does she cook, clean, and
other personal questions. so here she is in her own words answering those questions for us. >> my name is jazz ison sinkfield. i'm here to introduce the world to my nails. my nails are 24 to 26 inches in length. this one right here is my longest nail. i go and get my nails done every month. the cost to maintain my nails, i pay $250 every month. my nails, they don't actually stop me from doing anything. the only thing that i have had problems doing is tying shoes and that's just about it. but everything else, i cook and clean. i have no problem with cutting up my vegetables. it's a must that i keep my hands clean because i do come in close contact with preparing my meal.
i do believe in a clean kitchen and washing my hands. i use alcohol to sterilize my hands, clean the nails on the outside and up under my nails. of course, everybody wanted to know as far as tying my shoes. either i can tuck them in like that or i can -- if my husband is at home with me, i can get him to tie them. but most of the time this is how i lace my shoes. i just lace them like that. and the shoestring go on the inside. now, using the bathroom. this is the tissue. i stetake the tissue, roll it o the role. and i'm ready to go.
my nails is a talent and a gift from god. i've been growing my nails now for 22 years. and i want to be an inspiration to others to let them know that follow your dreams. you can excel on being whomever you would like to be. >> all right. they call her mama jazz, and she is right here to answer more questions about those long, long nails. send me your twitter questions now.y u need to report a claim, alright. a real person will be there to help you. then you can use to view photos of the damage, track your claim, print an estimate. you want an english muffin? they literally hand you a toasted muffin with butter and jam. (sigh) whaa. tasty. that's, that's a complete dramatization of course, but you get my point. vo: geico 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance.
[ male announcer ] time to check your air conditioning? come to meineke now and get a free ac system check and a free cooler with paid ac service. meineke. we have the coolest customers. welcome back. i want to introduce you now to jazz singfield, an atlanta woman who has been growing her nails now for 22 years, 26 inches long, you heard me, 26 inches long. which one is that one? >> this one. >> that one. i don't want to get close. i don't want to break it. if i break it i'm in major trouble. all right, jazz. mama jazz. >> yes. >> first, before i ask you how you do stuff because you answered a lot. the big question is why. >> wehy am i growing them? >> yeah. >> well, first of all, i would like to give honor to god who is
the head of my life and send shoutouts to my pastor. pastor gregory williams and first lady of go to the memorial church in douglasville. >> okay. with that out of the way, why do you do it? >> well, i always have been able to grow my nails. my father is a pastor. and i couldn't grow them when i was smaller because he told me that i had to find my identity and once i found my identity, i started growing my nails. >> okay. so you've been growing them now for 22 years. >> yes. >> when they break are you like, oh, no. >> yes. >> how often do they break? >> not too often. if i break them i go back to my nail tech and she puts the acrylic back on them where they broke an mend it back together. >> so they never break at the base. >> no. >> never. >> never. >> do you protect them with something? >> i have acrylic. yes. >> so someone canned me on here, do you have any joint problems because -- are they heavy? >> no, they are not heavy.
>> oh, my god, i got to tell you, that's weird. do you frighten children ever? >> no, children are my biggest loved ones to my nails. actually. >> okay. someone says, how do you wash your hair? >> i have a utensil, hair utensil. and i just take and wash my hair with. >> okay. and this is from twitter. she says, okay, how does she sleep and how does she scratch the inside of her ear. >> okay. >> did you see that? that goes right in there no problem. >> right in there. yeah. >> do you know, are you the nail champion? >> i'm not aware that i am, no. >> i remember that from years ago there was a fingernail champion. this was the woman who was a secretary. her nails were that long. what do you do for a living, housewife or housekeeper, whatever? >> yes. >> homemaker, that's what i meant to say. >> that's okay. yes. >> and your kids? >> five kids.